Lincoln Model K 1936 Convertible Victoria by Brunn

Car producer : 

Lincoln

Model:

Model K 1936 Convertible Victoria by Brunn

Year:

1931-1939

Type:

Cabriolet



The Model K's days were numbered as the less-expensive and more-modern Lincoln-Zephyr debuted for 1936. A 7-passenger Model K limousine was the marque's best-selling model despite its $4700 price, however. The grille and front fascia were again redesigned, and a revised raked windshield and pressed steel wheels were now used.

Of all the coachbuilders to body Lincoln chassis, none is so closely associated with the marque as Brunn & Company, of Buffalo, New York. The association began well before Henry Ford’s purchase of the ailing Lincoln Motor Company, in the era of founder Leland. After the Ford takeover, Hermann A. Brunn and Edsel Ford hit it off very well, and new designs from Buffalo continued.

At its peak, Brunn & Co. employed 150 craftspeople and turned out some 20 bodies per month, with most of them destined for Lincoln. In order to continue the tradition, Brunn sent his only son, Hermann C. Brunn, to Paris to apprentice with Kellner. The younger Brunn returned a year later, well-versed in the carriage trade, and joined his father’s company.

Edsel Ford preferred that his suppliers specialize in certain types of bodies. Thus, Judkins was assigned berlines and coupes, Willoughby the limousines, and LeBaron the convertible sedans. Brunn was given the task of specializing in town cars and convertibles: soft-top broughams, cabriolets, victorias, and dual-cowl phaetons. It was probably no coincidence that these styles were favored by Edsel and thus assigned to his personal choice in coachbuilders.

Sold for: 242000 USD
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