Chalmer Model 30 Speedster

Car producer : 

Chalmer

Model:

Model 30 Speedster

Year:

1917-1923

Type:

Roadster



Chalmers Motor Company was an American automobile company located in Detroit, Michigan. It was named after Hugh Chalmers of the National Cash Register Company. It merged with the Maxwell Automobile Company, forerunner of Chrysler, in 1922, and ended all production in late 1923

The Chalmers company was formed when NCR CEO, Hugh Chalmers, purchased the interests of ER Thomas in the Thomas-Detroit company in 1908, and renamed the company Chalmers-Detroit.The name was changed to Chalmers in 1911.

Chalmers flourished in the 1910s. During 1917, following the April United States Declaration of War against Germany, Maxwell Motor Co took over Chalmers' operations to make cars and trucks for the US Government. Chalmers then faltered in the post-World War I recession in 1920. It merged with the Maxwell Automobile Company, forerunner of Chrysler, in 1922, and terminated production in late 1923.

With a 115 in (2921 mm) wheelbase on 34 in (86 cm) wheels, Chalmers were expensive cars for the period. The 30 Touring and the 30 Roadster sold for US$1500,[ when the Oldsmobile Runabout was priced at US$650, while the Cole 30 was US$1500, and the Oakland 40 was US$1600. The Chalmers 30 Coupe at US$2400 was nearer the Enger 40 car at US$2400, while 40 Touring and 40 Roadster at US$2750 and 40 Torpedo at US$3000 were still below American's lowest-price model, at US$4250.

Taking part in early racing, a Chalmers won the 1910 Glidden Tour.

Sold for: 357000 USD
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