Aston Martin 1,5 litre 2.Series MKII LWB 4-seat Tourer

Car producer : 

Aston Martin

Model:

1,5 litre 2.Series MKII LWB 4-seat Tourer

Year:

1934-1935

Type:

Roadster



After the war, the company was refounded at Abingdon Road, Kensington and a new car designed to carry the Aston-Martin name. Bamford left in 1920 and the company was revitalised with funding from Count Louis Zborowski. In 1922, Bamford & Martin produced cars to compete in the French Grand Prix, which went on to set world speed and endurance records at Brooklands. Three works Team Cars with 16-valve twin cam engines were built for racing and record breaking: chassis number 1914, later developed as the Green Pea; chassis number 1915, the Razor Blade record car; and chassis number 1916, later developed as the Halford Special.

Approximately 55 cars were built for sale in two configurations, long chassis and short chassis. The company went bankrupt in 1924 and was bought by Lady Charnwood, who put her son John Benson on the board. The company failed again in 1925 and the factory closed in 1926, with Lionel Martin leaving.

Between 1926 and 1937 Bertelli was both technical director and designer of all new Aston Martins, since known as "Bertelli cars". Bertelli was an experienced automobile engineer, having designed cars for Enfield & Allday, and an engine of his design - an overhead-camshaft four-cylinder of 1,492cc - powered the new 11.9hp Aston, known also as the '12/50' or '1½-Litre'. They included the 1½-litre "T-type", "International", "Le Mans", "MKII" and its racing derivative, the "Ulster", and the 2-litre 15/98 and its racing derivative, the "Speed Model". Most were open two-seater sports cars bodied by Bert Bertelli's brother Enrico (Harry), with a small number of long-chassis four-seater tourers, dropheads and saloons also produced.

Based on the 1½-liter road car, the duo featured dry-sump lubrication a feature that would stand them in good stead in long distance sports car events and this was carried over to the International sports model, newly introduced for 1929. Built in two wheelbase lengths, the International was manufactured between 1929 and 1932, mostly with bodies by Augustus's brother Enrico 'Harry' Bertelli.

The 'Le Mans' label was first applied to the competition version of the (1st Series) International following Aston's class win and 5th place overall in the 1931 Le Mans race.

The second series of 1½ Liter cars were introduced in February 1932, although aesthetically it appeared to be just an update, there was a lot more to it under the skin. Most notably the cars featured an all new chassis, a Laycock transmission now mounted to the engine and the worm drive was sensibly revised by replacing it with an ENV spiral bevel drive. As before an International, dubbed 'New International', and the more sporting Le Mans was offered.

Le Mans engine had a 7.5:1 compression ratio, 25% higher than the standard model which allowed it to develop some 70bhp, enough to propel the car to a guaranteed 84mph. Large drums filled the whole of the wheels to ensure that braking was efficient, the combination and relatively lightweight body made for a nimble sports car.

The Aston Martin MKII, introduced in 1934 and produced only until December 1935, remains among the finest of the famed “Bertelli cars.” The MKII featured a reinforced ladder-frame chassis, improved front-axle control and large-diameter Alfin drum brakes. Powerful and smooth, the MKII engine produced 73 bhp in standard form, allowing for an 85 mph top speed. Only 166 MKIIs are believed to have been produced at Feltham, including 20 Ulster racing cars.

Sold for: 138000 GBP
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