Ferrari 308 GTB Dino Steel by Scaglietti

Car producer : 

Ferrari

Model:

308 GTB Dino Steel by Scaglietti

Year:

1977-1980

Type:

Coupe



The Dino 308 GT4 and 208 GT4 (later Ferrari 308 GT4 and 208 GT4) were mid-engined V8 2+2 cars built by Ferrari. The Dino 308 GT4 was introduced in 1973 and supplemented by the 208 GT4 in 1975. The cars were sold with Dino badging (continuing the Dino brand to differentiate non-V12 Ferrari) until May 1976, when they received Ferrari badging. The GT4 was replaced by the Mondial 8 in 1980 after a production run of 2,826 vehicles.

Introduced at the Geneva Motor Show in 1975, the 208 GT4 2+2 was a low-displacement version of the V8 produced for the Italian market, where cars with engines larger than two litres were subjected to a doubled VAT (38%). The engine was de-bored to (66.8x71 mm) 2.0 L (1991 cc) V8, resulting in the smallest production V8 in history for a road car.

Power output was 170hp (127 kW) at 7,700 rpm for a top speed of 137 mph (220 km/h). Smaller Weber 34 DCNF carburetors, a lower final drive ratio and skinnier tires completed the technical changes for the 208. Chrome (rather than black) accents outside and the lack of fog lights were external visual indicators of the smaller-engined GT4. Inside the 208 GT4 featured a black rather than silver dash facing.

The 208 GTB replaced the 208 GT4 in 1980.

The Pininfarina-styled Ferrari 308 GTB was introduced at the Paris Motor Show in 1975 as a supplement to the Bertone-shaped 2+2 Dino 308 GT4 and a direct replacement for the 2-seater Dino 246.

The GT4 2+2 was a groundbreaking model for Ferrari in several ways: it was the first production Ferrari to feature the mid-engined V8 layout that would become the bulk of the company's business in the succeeding decades, and was the first production Ferrari with Bertone (rather than Pininfarina) designed bodywork. Pininfarina was upset by the decision to give cross-town rival Bertone the design, considering all they had done for Ferrari. The styling featured angular lines entirely different from its curvaceous 2-seater brother, the Dino 246, and was controversial at the time. Some journalists compared it to the Bertone-designed Lancia Stratos and Lamborghini Urraco, also penned by Marcello Gandini. From the cockpit the driver sees only the road. It has perfect 360 degree visibility, no blind spots, upright and comfortable seating position, a real trunk, a back seat for soft luggage, and very easy engine access. Enzo Ferrari himself took a major role in its design, even having a mock-up made where he could sit in the car to test different steering, pedals and cockpit seating positioning

Its F106 AB V8 engine was equipped with four twin-choke Weber 40DCNF carburettors and single coil ignition. European versions produced 255 PS (188 kW; 252hp) at 6600 rpm (7700 rpm redline), but American versions were down to 240 PS (177 kW; 237bhp) at 6,600 rpm due to emissions control devices. European specification cars used dry sump lubrication. Cars destined to the Australian, Japanese and US market were fitted with a conventional wet sump engine from the GT4

A notable aspect of the early 308 GTB was that, although still built by Carrozzeria Scaglietti, its bodywork was entirely made of glass-reinforced plastic (or GRP), allowing a very light weight of 1,050 kg (2,315 lb). This lasted until June 1977, when the 308 was switched to steel bodies, resulting in an, alleged, 150 kg (331 lb) additional weight. However, a steel-bodied GTB only weighs 12 kg (26 lb) more than its fiberglass body counterpart. Standard wheels were 5-spoke 14-inch alloy. 16-inch wheels were made available later as an option, together with sports exhaust system, high compression pistons and high lift camshaft.

At the 1977 Frankfurt Motor Show the Targa topped 308 GTS was introduced. Independently from the market, all GTS used a wet sump engine and were steel-bodied. European GTB models retained the dry sump lubrication until 1981.

There were 3219 GTS and 2897 GTB examples were made during the 1975–1980 production periods. Only 808 of the first fiberglass (vetroresina in Italian) version were made.

There were two series of GT4; the earlier cars featured a twin distributor engine and fog lamps mounted in the front valance. Later cars had a single distributor engine, with fog lamps mounted behind the front grille

Test performance, 308 GTB (GRP): Weight (curb with 74 l fuel) 2,778 lb (1,260 kg), acceleration 0-100 mph 15.0s, 0–100 km/h 6.5 s, 100–200 km/h 17.8s, top speed 159 mph (256 km/h).

Sold for: 148500 USD
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